Yellow Moons (a poem)

be careful, son

don’t delve into

too much mystery

it’ll consume you

pray to yellow moons

inky-black skies

howling wolves

green wilderness

cycles of rebirth

summer turns to autumn

the land sustains us

be careful, son

& brave

(Photo by Izabelle Acheson on Unsplash)

Seductive Voices (a poem)

I heard those seductive voices in darkness

not the ones you think

they weren’t from lipsticked-maidens

call girls nestled in hotel sheets

the voices were calls of

violence, conspiracy

they called not from red-light districts

but corners of the online world

they promised secrets of

the way the world worked –

I said no thank you, sir

your secrets are safe with me

but I won’t agree

to be part & parcel

to your devious proposals.

(Photo by NASA on Unsplash)

Valley of Shadows (a poem)

He traversed the valley for days

seeking the ancient one who’d provide

nourishment to his ailing soul

words from a holy mouth that

would unlock secrets of his inner-being –

sloshing through thick mud, the traveler perceives him

through the fog –

the figure of the ancient man

glowing, golden in the valley of shadows.

(Photo by John Joumaa on Unsplash)

Reason for Being (a poem)

What’s your reason for being?

In Japan, they have a word for this: ikigai

let’s ponder it, you + me – step into my office,

care for a cigar?

think about those times you wanted to end it all

before the Fall

of America – now, we live amidst the ruins

you must have a reason to keep movin’

what’s your secret?

(Photo by Jason Blackeye on Unsplash)

Conspiracy Theory (a prose poem)

It’s easy to believe in a conspiracy theory. It provides a simple solution to a complex question; makes you feel like you possess secret understanding.

But life is made of shades of gray – nothing in this shady world is ever entirely black or white. Traveling through uncertain terrain takes courage + an unwavering belief there’s truth to be found –

and it’s not always hidden behind layers of dishonesty.

(Photo by Elijah O’Donnell on Unsplash)

Book Review: The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami

There are many ways to dissect and analyze a novel like The WindUp Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami. The original Japanese version of the book was released in three parts, and the English translation that I read was just over 600 pages. The novel is packed with different thematic elements and symbols, and it’s easy to get lost in the tangled web that Murakami spins.

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