Music Friday: Bert Jansch

I’m toning it down from heavy rock this week for Music Friday and turning to a Scottish folk musician named Bert Jansch. I like lots of different kinds of music, and that includes folk (both old and new). I’ve always loved Neil Young, and I also dig newer folk acts like Fleet Foxes. I stumbled upon Bert Jansch about a year ago and I’ve grown to love him.

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Albert Camus (graphic art)

Here’s something I made on Canva recently – just playing around with various filters and effects. The man pictured, of course, is the French philosopher and absurdist Albert Camus.

Music of Democracy (a poem)

dance in the street, move to the music

of democracy – our long national nightmare

is over, we’ve been chopped to pieces

by a man filled with grievances –

we’re hoping he fades away

locked in his gilded towers

removed from power

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On Racism and Growing up in the American South

Growing up in the South, you learn from an early age about racism. Our public schools taught from books that The Daughters of the Confederacy bought for schools. Eventually, we read books that actually told some truth.

I remember reading about the Civil Rights movement and its leaders.  I remember learning details about Martin Luther King, Jr.  I remember feeling shame to know he was assassinated in my home state of Tennessee.

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New Facts (a prose poem)

History is collective memory, and it’s always subject to correction.

It’s written by winners, whether daughters of despots or democrats. They build bronze statues that inform us of what happened, who’s calling the shots, who owns the space you occupy.

As the city convulses, an ex-mayor’s monument is fractured, beat to the ground. Our historical texts must be rewritten, newspaper editors must be removed, the revolution must be televised and live streamed to your social media feeds, and you must forget what you’ve learned because

there are new facts.

(Photo by The New York Public Library on Unsplash)