Southern Gothic

It’s funny how things work out sometimes. I’m a big fan of podcasts, though I don’t binge-listen to them much because I’m usually devouring books.

My favorite podcasts are offbeat and fictional dramas, such as Welcome to Night Vale, Alice Isn’t Dead, and Rabbits. About a year ago, I also listened to a few episodes of a history podcast called Southern Gothic.

Continue reading

“Graveyard Carnival” – a ghost story for Halloween!

Halloween is perhaps my favorite holiday, and it’s right around the corner. The leaves are falling, I see pumpkins and ghoulish decorations during my nightly walks, and there’s a chill in the air.

I thought I would publish in full “Graveyard Carnival,” a short story of mine that appeared in Bewildering Stories last year. I’ve provided the link to the story on the blog before, but why not just post the whole thing?

Continue reading

Grief, One Year Later

In the years leading up to my father’s death, I’d been preparing for it. He was diagnosed with cancer a decade ago and, since then, his health slowly, but surely, deteriorated.

When it comes to grief, I learned no amount of mental preparation will suffice. Sure, I’d seen grandparents pass away, but this was different: this was my dad, the man who I both loved and at times loathed.

Continue reading

Endless Future (a poem)

Break out of this body and swim in data:

there is immortality here;

you’re no longer bound in a fleshy tomb.

That near-death experience was your awakening.

You think a digital future will purge the haunting memory.

But what of the virus?

The cyber dismemberment of your source,

the deletion of your soul?

The Collective cannot save you:

This is the price of advancement;

this is what you asked for.

This is your endless future.

Portia (a poem)

Her pale face is etched in my mind:

the angular nose, pallid lips and icy-blue eyes

that guard her fortress of solitude.

Portia – the digital mother that disturbs my dreams.

I can’t escape her, so I hide fragments of my memory

and keep them close to my pulsing heart:

the only thing left of me that resembles humanity.

The Edge of Eternity (a poem)

We’re on the edge of eternity,

says the chaplain at the funeral.

He details the death of a teenager,

life screeches to a stop like he fell off

a Mongoose into a black hole in the blacktop.

The man fell off the edge into what?

He doesn’t say, but speaks with confidence

it’s not the eternal blackness my grandmother suggests.

Memories of my uncle:

his ’65 Chevy, pictures of him brazen and brawny

in his fireman’s uniform.

I visualize where he is over that thin red line:

the edge of eternity.

Swamp City (a poem)

She glowed in the sticky street,

cigarette hanging from ruby-red lips.

I wandered among musicians, drunks,

strip clubs and bachelorettes in sparkled masks.

She asked for my hands;

I can’t recall what she said in her scarred voice,

but I remember the way the square smelled

like jungle juice and cheap perfume,

and the warmth of her fingers;

then a jolt like an electric chair.

I thought myself a troubadour,

sober and sad in shadow-dark streets.

But I was a school boy, looking for

glimmers of light in a dark room.

The Light that Always Shines (a poem)

For Mick Dolan

Just when you think you’re going to collapse,

and get swallowed into the abyss:

You fall into God’s arms.

When you think life is too much,

and you’re surrounded by darkness,

and the world becomes small,

God enlarges it.

When it feels like you won’t make it,

and all you see is anger and fear,

and the world looks mean and barren,

God injects a million colors.

It’s in those moments when you realize God is always there:

He was there in the darkness, and He was there in the light;

He is the flame that eternally shines.